Wednesday, April 18, 2007

Virginia Tech: Notes From the Dark Side

I'm certainly against politcizing the tragedy of the Virginia Tech Shootings. But I think we can all enjoy the spectacle of OTHER people politicizing it.

First, hat tip to Wonkette: a commenter in the alt.fan.rushlimbaugh newsgroup.

The Korean Shooter Was A Democrat And A Terrorist
1.Cho said he hated rich Americans. That is typical of class envy and democrats.
2.Cho said he hates American society. Again, that is typical of socialistic, communistic democrats.
3.Cho planned ever detail of his attack.
4.Cho attacked the USA because of his hatred for America.
Though he was a lone actor, Cho was a terrorist because he hated who and what WE are though he was going to one of our finest Universities. Cho was one more terrorst attacking the USA because we are NOT what he wanted us to be, just like muslim extremists who hate us and have killed us for not being like them.


If you crave video, check out Olberman's Worst Person In The World, VT Edition. Note John Derbyshire's response: “I’m still not too clear about who this Keith Omdurman character is. He’s plainly a leftie, though — one of that legion who pine for the days when they could tongue-polish Stalin’s boots — so I am proud to be top of his Worst list.” (hat tip to Think Progress). Way to soothe those ruffled feathers, Derbyshire!

The New York Times argues for Gun Control, as though that would have stopped the whole thing. Michelle Malkin, bless her big adorable heart, argues that the tragedy would have been controlled had we only allowed ALL the students to carry guns. "What if just one student in one of those classrooms had been in lawful possession of a concealed weapon for the purpose of self-defense?" Indeed! Let's pass 'em out to the high school kids too... how would that hurt anything?

The President's comments at various points have been distinctly un-political, sensitive and presidential. Logged and noted, sir.

Finally, my favorite: The argument that somehow, allowing abortion leads to campus shootings. I can follow the logic train on that one, but I think I'll catch the war-of-choice-leads-to-campus-shootings express instead. Less detours, dontcha know.

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Update: BoingBoing steers us in the direction of an all-purpose essay written just after the 9/11 attack.

Many people will use this terrible tragedy as an excuse to put through a political agenda other than my own. This tawdry abuse of human suffering for political gain sickens me to the core of my being. Those people who have different political views from me ought to be ashamed of themselves for thinking of cheap partisan point-scoring at a time like this. In any case, what this tragedy really shows us is that, so far from putting into practice political views other than my own, it is precisely my political agenda which ought to be advanced.

1 comment:

skot said...

It's numbingly self-evident that in our current media environment tragic events are quickly followed by politicized, uninformed bloviating. It sort of makes one long for the days before hyper-communication.

One of the most interesting deals you outlined is that Limbaugh fan gassing about how Cho hated rich people. This was probably written before his "press release" to NBC was made public, when this agenda was made clear and central-- actually, his real primary agenda was to act on his insanity: the class warfare was his stated goal. I don't think Cho had time to check everyone's bank balance before he killed them, which reinforces the crazy deal.

Hatred and envy of wealthy and obnoxious students was a factor at Columbine as well. I'm not going to suggest rich kids had it coming or anything, but if I was one I'd think long and hard about the effect some of their more negative social behaviors can potentially have on those less fortunate (or those modestly fortunate but crazy). There may be some sort of lesson to be learned from all of this: "Antiquated" social concepts like bourgeois propriety and noblesse oblige have become fading memories, but perhaps they served an unsuspected purpose: self-preservation.